Issue #7

  1. Introducing SIX + GENDERS

  2. My Golem, Her Tower

  3. Do You Know Anshl, the Yeshive Bokher?

  4. Centers of Gravity

  5. This Rumor of Darger's Armies of Girls

  6. My Body is a Prophet

  7. Radical Pleasures and Radical Critique

  8. Let It Bleed, Rona and I

  9. Table for Eleggua, Table for Elijah

  10. Standing Beneath Sinai

  11. Voluminous Absence: Rosemary Mayer’s “Shekinah” and “Bat Kol”

  12. My Own Silence

  13. License to Opacity

  14. "In the future there will be no such creatures like me."

  15. Tefillin Tikkun HaKlali

  16. Talmud Gender Codex

Talmud Gender Codex

Etai Rogers-Fett

  • Etai Rogers-Fett, Talmud Gender Codex, 30 x 40 inches, acrylic painting and sketches, 2019.

  • Etai Rogers-Fett, Talmud Gender Codex, 30 x 40 inches, acrylic painting and sketches, 2019.

  • Etai Rogers-Fett, Talmud Gender Codex, 30 x 40 inches, acrylic painting and sketches, 2019.

  • Etai Rogers-Fett, Talmud Gender Codex, 30 x 40 inches, acrylic painting and sketches, 2019.

The repetitive symbols throughout Talmud Gender Codex are derived from letters and concepts connected to each of the “six genders,” as well as three additional concepts associated with the artist’s Jewish Trans experience:

בענקשאַפֿט / חשק, longing/desire,
אמת / בינה, truth/understanding,
דאָ, פֿון אָנהײב / אין סוף, here, from the beginning/infinite.

 

Etai Rogers-Fett is an Ashkenazi Jewish Trans person who makes art and facilitates art making with kids and adults. His political and artistic self was first shaped by the communities he grew up in in Los Angeles and teachers who modeled expression as a community practice of joy, grief, and narrative shifting. Etai organizes with Occupation Free DC, Jewish Voice for Peace DC Chapter, and the New Synagogue Project. He has a long love affair with the language of Yiddish in song, painting, and translation work and is inspired by contemporary Yiddishist efforts that both honor and reimagine the language’s past connections to class, gender, and Jewish identity. As part of the Yiddish Burlesque troupe, The Shmutzik Shmates, he performs as Bikher-Dik, a nebish daddy plotting revolution from the yeshivah benches.